By Philip K. Dick

With this choice of tales, readers are drawn right into a international with a mysterious twist, a feeling of otherness that eludes description. This thought-provoking writing--part technology fiction, half secret, half fantasy--includes the entire writer's earliest brief and medium-length fiction.

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The Short Happy Life of the Brown Oxford and Other Classic Stories (The Collected Stories of Philip K. Dick, Vol. 1)

With this number of tales, readers are drawn right into a international with a mysterious twist, a feeling of otherness that eludes description. This thought-provoking writing--part technological know-how fiction, half secret, half fantasy--includes the entire writer's earliest brief and medium-length fiction.

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Extra info for The Short Happy Life of the Brown Oxford and Other Classic Stories (The Collected Stories of Philip K. Dick, Vol. 1)

Example text

Come now,” he said kindly, “don’t take it so hard; there are other things to do. ” But Benton only stared. At last he said, “But you don’t understand: I have no invention. ” the Controller exclaimed. “But I was here the day you entered it yourself! I saw you sign the statement of ownership! ” He stared at Benton. ” A moment passed, and then a tube appeared in the circle of light. The Controller lifted the cylindrical object out and passed it to Benton. “You’ll find your signed statement there,” he said, “and it has your fingerprints in the print squares.

He will have been able to set up a chain of circumstance by this time that our Stabilizers will have trouble in breaking. Perhaps we should visit Mr. ” Benton sat in his living room and stared. His eyes were set in a kind of glassy rigidness and he had not moved for some time. The globe had been talking to him, telling him of its plans, its hopes. Now it stopped suddenly. “They are coming,” the globe said. It was resting on the couch beside him, and its faint whisper curled to his brain like a wisp of smoke.

Civilization has been climbing for centuries, especially since the twenty-fifth century. ” “I know that,” Benton said, puzzled. “I also know the multiplication table. ” The Controller ignored him. “We have, however, broken that law. One hundred years ago—” One hundred years ago! It hardly seemed as far back as that when Eric Freidenburg of the States of Free Germany stood up in the International Council Chamber and announced to the assembled delegates that mankind had at last reached its peak. Further progress forward was impossible.

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