By Jonathan Wilson

'Aloof, solitary, emotionless, the crack goalie is within the streets through entranced small boys. He vies with the matador and the flying aces, an item of extremely joyful adulation. he's the lone eagle, the guy of puzzle, the final defender' Vladimir Nabokov Albert Camus, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Yevgeny Yevtushenko, Pope John Paul II, Julian Barnes and never forgetting Nabokov himself ...it's secure to claim the location of goalkeeper has through the years attracted a distinct kind of personality than your normal footballer. during this first-ever cultural background of the 'loner' among the posts, Jonathan Wilson strains the occasionally harmful highbrow and literary preoccupations of the keeper, and appears at how the location has secured a definite existential cool. He travels to the Bassa area of Cameroon, which has produced of Africa's maximum keepers, and in addition to Romania to speak to Helmuth Duckadam, who stored 4 consequences for Steaua Bucharest within the 1986 eu Cup ultimate. His soaking up tactical and technical insights into soccer heritage even take us again to the times while fits have been contested and not using a guy among the sticks. THE OUTSIDER is the definitive account of that the majority mysterious of footballing personalities - the goalkeeper.

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The Outsider: A History of the Goalkeeper

'Aloof, solitary, emotionless, the crack goalie is within the streets by means of entranced small boys. He vies with the matador and the flying aces, an item of overjoyed adulation. he's the lone eagle, the guy of poser, the final defender' Vladimir Nabokov Albert Camus, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Yevgeny Yevtushenko, Pope John Paul II, Julian Barnes and never forgetting Nabokov himself .

Extra resources for The Outsider: A History of the Goalkeeper

Sample text

On the other hand, if any goalkeeper made a good save of a goal, he was called for immediately to play out, and thenceforth he played out always.? s a basic logical flaw there, of course, in that as soon as somebody proved themselves good at goalkeeping they ceased to be a goalkeeper but, more than that, there was a stigma attached to playing in goal, one that, in Britain at least, appears to linger still beneath the surface. All schools had their own rules that depended largely on the pitch available, but the idea of multiple goalkeepers seems to have been common.

In his 1801 book Sports and Pastime of the People of England, for instance, Joseph Strutt described a game in Yorkshire. When a match at football is made an equal number of competitors take the field and stand between two goals placed at a distance of eighty or one hundred yards from each other,? he wrote. The goal is usually made of two sticks driven into the ground about two or three feet apart.? No need then, with a goal that slender, for anybody to be designated to stand between the posts. The Eton Wall Game, similarly, played on a pitch 120 yards long by 6 yards wide, had goals so small ?

The only question then, if the story is taken at face value, is to which of the three finals in which he played he was referring. 1 in Derby; it makes sense to have trained in Sheffield (assuming that is the cutlery town referred to) for games in the east Midlands; less so for a match in Birmingham, which is where they played their 1884 semi-final. Whether true or not, the anecdote highlights the other problem with goalkeepers, the other reason why they so often evoked mistrust: they were seen as corruptible.

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