By Michael L. Hadley

«Iron coffins», «grey wolves» and «steel sharks» - solid in pictures reminiscent of those, submarines are icons of Germanys maritime culture. In books and movies, submarines were used to advertise political ambitions and to justify and clarify an exciting and infrequently ambiguous prior. This paintings explores the cult and tradition surrounding the most mythologized guns of battle. Basing his examine on a few 250 German novels, memoirs, fictionalized histories, and flicks, Michael Hadley examines the preferred snapshot of the German submarine and weighs the values, reasons and perceptions of German writers and movie makers. He considers the belief of the submarine as a war-winning weapon and the exploits of the «band of brothers» who made up the U-boat crews.

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Count Not the Dead: The Popular Image of the German Submarine

«Iron coffins», «grey wolves» and «steel sharks» - solid in pictures equivalent to those, submarines are icons of Germanys maritime culture. In books and movies, submarines were used to advertise political pursuits and to justify and clarify an fascinating and occasionally ambiguous earlier. This paintings explores the cult and tradition surrounding the most mythologized guns of struggle.

Additional resources for Count Not the Dead: The Popular Image of the German Submarine

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Since its founding in 1899 the annual Nauticus had had a clearly defined mission. Its authors were bent upon 13 Introduction marshalling broad popular support for navalism in the service of Germany's maritime interests. Having achieved such a large measure of success, the editors of the issue for 1908 could, with disarming frankness, put all their cards on the table. As their preface explained: The first issues of Nauticus appeared at the time of the first naval bills, and were designed as aggressive promotional material [Agitationsmittel] in support of the great task of the time - namely convincing the German people of the truth that a defence capability at sea is a condition of life for any state that wants to thrive and not fritter its paltry existence away.

Ullstein's War Book series was a staple throughout the 1914-18 conflict and continued unabated during the interwar years and into the Second World War. The series became a tradition among nationalist and conservative sectors of German society. 7 The takeover was not primarily because the firm was Jewish, but rather because large sectors of the populace not only delighted in the action-packed plots of its books, but trusted in them as authoritative and right-thinking. It was, in short, a truly "national" German firm.

Gripped by Britain's stranglehold on German trade, the German navy resorted to the weapons that conventional thinking had regarded as secondary submarines and mines. It ultimately developed the submarine cruiser, a new engine of war without legal precedent in international law. Germany's new "infallible weapon" soon produced its own mythology. "Silent and secretly, as befits the nature of our weapon," a submariner wrote, "we entered the Great War. "5 i8 Count Not the Dead Undaunted and as yet unsung, German submariners faced the enemy alone.

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